MELLON

I do Storyboards for Archer on FX.
I make comic books for myself.

Atlanta by way of Kansas City.

Suicide Sisters vol. 1 Available Now.

Don’t wait for permission to make something that’s interesting or amusing to you. Just do it now. Don’t wait. Find a story idea, start making it, give yourself a deadline, show it to people who’ll give you notes to make it better. Don’t wait till you’re older, or in some better job than you have now. Don’t wait for anything. Don’t wait till some magical story idea drops into your lap. That’s not where ideas come from. Go looking for an idea and it’ll show up. Begin now. Be a fucking soldier about it and be tough.

Ira Glass to Lifehacker. I’m Ira Glass, Host of This American Life, and This Is How I Work.

Quick tip for things to do immediately post-interview:

When I come out of an interview, I jot down the things I remember as being my favorite moments. For an hour-long interview usually it’s just four or five moments, but if out I’m reporting all day, I’ll spend over an hour at night typing out every favorite thing that happened. This is handier than you might think. Often this short list of favorite things will provide the backbone to the structure to my story.

Read through for the gear This American Life uses and its editing process.

(via futurejournalismproject)

This is really good advice, and worth keeping!

(via tamorapierce)

(via kellysue)

I think #2 is wrong. I get the intention, but I think it’s wording is incorrect and tells people to seek out the wrong road when trying new things and looking to move themselves forward. "if you ask for permission, the answer is always no. So I developed a practice of just doing things." - Ian MacKaye

I think #2 is wrong. I get the intention, but I think it’s wording is incorrect and tells people to seek out the wrong road when trying new things and looking to move themselves forward.

"if you ask for permission, the answer is always no. So I developed a practice of just doing things." - Ian MacKaye

(via spottedjabot)

Today.

Today.

Here I was well into my 20’s with a college degree and a corporate job. I was playing music with no intention of generating money or some massive fan base and, all of a sudden, I had to find excuses to get out of work in order to go tour Europe or Japan. I was recording albums on one of my favorite metal labels of all time (Relapse Records). I was collaborating with some of my favorite musicians. And before I even realized it, I was making 100% of my living creating art.

How did this happen? It happened because we ignored the rules. For the first time in my musical trajectory, I was creating without the idea that there was a right way or a wrong way to do things. No two people are alike. No two people have the same exact cultural influences. Art is not a two party system and never should be.

for the 3’s of you that care.

for the 3’s of you that care.